When we fight, we win!

Teamsters 117 Wire

DOC Contract Vote Dates, Times, and Locations

 

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In August, we will be holding contract vote meetings for all DOC Teamsters to vote on your 2019-2021 collective bargaining agreement.

It's important that your voice is heard! Please attend one of the listed meetings at your facility and cast your vote. Thank you!

You can view days, times, and facilities below. Click on the link to your facility to RSVP.

DAY DATE TIMES INSTITUTION
Monday 8/6/2018 0630, 0900, 1130, 1430, 1630 MCC
Tuesday 8/7/2018 0500, 0630, 1130, 1300, 1410, 1630 CCCC
Tuesday 8/7/2018 1100, 1230, 1420, 1630, 2100, 2200 WCC
Wednesday 8/8/2018 0530, 0625, 0800, 1130, 1415, 1530 AHCC
Wednesday 8/8/2018 0900 MICC
Thursday 8/9/2018 0500, 0630, 1130, 1300, 1410, 1630 SCCC
Friday 8/10/2018 1100, 1200 SWRBO
Friday 8/10/2018 1130, 1300, 1410, 2100 MCCCW
Monday 8/13/2018 0700, 0800, 1400 CIHQ
Monday 8/13/2018 1130, 1300, 1410, 2100 OCC
Monday 8/13/2018 0500, 0800, 1130, 1300,1415, 1530, 1630 WSP
Tuesday 8/14/2018 1130, 1300, 1410, 2100 CBCC
Tuesday 8/14/2018 1100, 1200 Central Pharmacy
Wednesday 8/15/2018 0600, 0800, 1130, 1300, 1415, 1530, 1630, 1800 CRCC
Thursday 8/16/2018 1100, 1200 DOC HQ
Thursday 8/16/2018 0500, 0630, 1130, 1300, 1410, 1630 LCC
Friday 8/17/2018 0620, 1130, 1300, 1410, 1530 WCCW

 


With Flagrant Response from the State, DOC Bargaining Heads into Mediation

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Earlier this month, our union negotiations committee passed a thoughtful economic proposal to the State as we continue the process of bargaining over your 2019-2021 contract.

Our proposal was backed by comparable data from other jurisdictions and took into account the unique and critical nature of your work and the important public service you provide in keeping our communities safe. It took into consideration the recruitment and retention problems at the Department and contemplated the amount of overtime that is frequently required and is extreme by any measure.

"I am not willing to back down. Our people need to survive, and I’ll fight for them."

In last week’s negotiations, the State came back with a response that was extremely disrespectful. Kathe Jackson, a nurse at the Washington State Penitentiary and a member of our union committee expressed her frustration. “We work every day. We place ourselves at risk of injury and death just to feed our families. For the State not to acknowledge that is offensive.”

When asked questions about how they put their proposal together, the State’s response was: “This is what we can afford.” They did not give any consideration into the dangerous work you perform or the critical services you provide. The State did not acknowledge how employees at Washington’s correctional facilities are underpaid as compared to other people doing the same type of work in similar jurisdictions.

To say that the bargaining committee was frustrated is a huge understatement. “I am not willing to back down,” said Jackson. “Our people need to survive, and I’ll fight for them.”

This week we are in mediation, and I hope to have a better report for you at the end of it. Please stay tuned and watch for the email updates. We promise to keep you apprised of what’s going on with your contract.

Thank you and as always, stay safe.

Michelle Woodrow
President and Director of Corrections & Law Enforcement
Lead negotiator for DOC Collective Bargaining Agreement

 


Teamsters at Sysco Will Not Be Disrespected

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Members of the bargaining committee in front of Teamsters Tukwila Hall.


Teamster members of Local 117 will not be disrespected. It was just the second day of bargaining with Sysco when the company proposed eliminating restrictions on the amount of overtime they can force our members to work and restricting access to vacation time during the summer months.

"We are not prepared to make any concessions. Better wages, healthcare and pension are on the agenda."

“Drivers are already driving 12 to 14 hours a day and barely see their families,” said Roland Griffin, Sysco Warehouse worker of 25 years. His co-worker and fellow shop steward Erick Engel added: “These proposals strip even more time away from our families and negatively affect our overall quality of life”

Secretary-Treasurer John Scearcy is leading these negotiations. “Our members have provided us clear direction. They deserve a fair contract, and I am committed to them getting one,” he said.  

Sysco is the world's largest broadline food distributor. The hard labor of its workers has grown its profits beyond expectation for three quarters in a row. Despite that, the company is looking to make the working conditions even more difficult for workers.

“Sysco it trying to play hardball with the bargaining team, but we are not prepared to make any concessions. Better wages, healthcare and pension are on the agenda,” concluded Engel.

 


Total Comp Bargaining Update

Last week in total comp negotiations, our King County Coalition team reviewed the counterproposal by the County as we continue to negotiate over wage increases for 2019 and 2020, enhancements to your health and welfare while maintaining zero costs to the members, and other improvements in your contract.

With the passage of the new WA State Sick Leave and Paid Family Leave laws in the legislature, there was a discussion on definitions and provisions related to paid leave. There was also progress made on the short and long-term disability provisions of your contract.

In regards to early retirement, the Coalition is pushing to bring back the retiree medical program which was previously phased out with the advent of the Affordable Care Act. Another aspect of the talks included encouraging green travel for King County employees and potential help with childcare.

“We’re getting closer and it’s a cause for hope,” said Vicky Moore, a shop steward and a member of the bargaining committee. Listen to her give an update of this bargaining session.

The Coalition team will be meeting on July 26 to work on a counterproposal to the County.

For any questions, please talk to a bargaining committee member or your union representative.

 


2018 Annual Golf Tournament and Fund Raiser

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The General Teamsters Retirees Club is holding its 2018 Annual Golf Tournament and GTRC Scholarship Fund Raiser on Saturday, August 11, 2018 at Foster Golf Links. It will include raffle prizes and "Poison Ball" challenge. Please register by August 6 for a day of fun and golf. Click here for more information and an application.


They Never Gave Up: Drivers' Unity and Resilience Prevails at SeaTac, Ends “Pay-to-Work”

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Last week the Port of Seattle Commission voted to approve an agreement to officially end taxi contractor Eastside for Hire’s “Pay-to-Work” fleet reduction plan, and provide stability for the remainder of Eastside’s contract with the Port.

Union taxi and flat-rate drivers celebrated the victory and vowed to continue to take action through their union to have a voice at work.

Back in April, taxi contractor Eastside for Hire announced the “Pay-to-Work” scheme by giving drivers just 5 days to make a choice – either agree to pay $9,000, or lose your job at the airport.

"What kept me going is the belief in fighting for our rights in this country."

Facing this impossible choice, over 200 drivers joined in a job action protesting the “Pay-to-Work” scheme. Taking action was a risk since some drivers had already been suspended by the company following a protest of exorbitant fees and unsanitary working conditions the previous year.

One of them was Worku Belayneh. “What kept me going is the belief in fighting for our rights in this country,” he said.

Before taking action, drivers made a commitment to each other that they refused to be divided. Instead this religiously and culturally diverse community stood united in their union, and packed Port Commission meetings time and time again to share their stories.

Throughout the campaign, drivers’ solidarity and commitment to each other was put to the test. Following one Port Commission meeting at which drivers testified, Eastside for Hire announced 30 day termination notices for 29 vehicles and their drivers.  

"We could never have achieved this without the union."

But, drivers did not back down. They rallied behind “The Sea-Tac 29” and raised their voices louder.

In the end, drivers’ strength and unity raised their plight to the top of the list on a busy Commission agenda even in a time of rapid airport expansion. The Port Commissioners understood that they had to act on this pressing issue.

Under the agreement approved last week,

  • Eastside for Hire is prohibited from increasing driver fees for the remainder of their contract with the Port. In fact, driver fees will decrease by $95 per week in June of 2019.
  • Eastside for Hire cannot terminate any driver for prior actions they took protesting the “Pay-to-Work” fleet reduction plan.
  • The Port retains the sole discretion to determine the number of vehicles in the fleet, and will not reduce the fleet size for the remainder of the Eastside contract except in cases of either 1) voluntary departures, or 2) future terminations “for cause.”
  • Eastside for Hire’s contract will end on September 30, 2019.

“We could never have achieved this victory without the union,” concludes Worku Belayneh. “Now I can focus on doing my job and raising my three children.”

Today drivers are looking forward to a better future and plan to maintain their unity to make sure they continue to have a voice at the airport.


DOC Bargaining Update: Union Economics on the Table

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Last week DOC negotiations shifted to economics as your Union presented its initial economic proposal. In making this proposal, your bargaining committee demanded that the State recognize the incredible service that correctional employees provide to protect the public.  

The proposal included salary increases for all classifications, improvement to shift differential, expansion of the Specialty Team Premium to include Honor Guard, Assignment Pay for Shift Commanders at stand-alone minimums and members working in Specialized Units, as well as cost-of-living increases for both years of the contract. We expect the State to respond when we meet this week.

In terms of our other proposals, Sally Thiessen, a Shop Steward at SCCC and a member of the bargaining team, summed it up best. “We’re waiting on just about everything we have submitted to them,” she said.

"Our leaders are constantly fighting for us."

“We are aggressively moving forward with the State, not allowing them to make the changes that can hinder our operation and negatively affect our livelihood and work-life balance. Our leaders are constantly fighting for us,” stated Doug Lambe, a Maintenance Mechanic and Shop Steward at WCCW who also sits at the negotiations table.

The bargaining committee’s frustration is mounting, as the State appears to be ill prepared every time we meet. Because of this, we expect to be in mediation the week of July 23 in hopes of reaching an agreement.

Our next negotiations session will be held on July 17 and July 18 at our Teamsters Union Hall in Tukwila. If you have questions about bargaining, talk to your negotiations committee members or your Union Representative.

Thank you for your service, please stay safe.

In Solidarity,

Michelle Woodrow

 

 

 

 


DOC Guardian: Staying Strong with Open Shop

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Read how our DOC bargaining team is fighting to protect workers and moving forward with strength, unity and resolve in negotiations with the State.

We will not let the Janus decision divide us because only we decide how strong our union will be. Read the summer Guardian here.


Teamster Talk of the Summer: We Decide Our Union Strength

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The Supreme Court ruling in Janus case may attempt to divide the working people, but the last word is with us. Read amazing stories of unity and power in face of this unjust attack in our summer edition of Teamster Talk. Read the summer edition here.


Strong Unions Undo Workplace Stress by Redistributing the Power of Decision Making

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Michael Rodriguez, a utility worker at the City of Pacific, says being part of a union makes his work a lot less difficult. Despite it being a demanding, frequently hazardous occupation, his membership in Teamsters 117 alleviates the work stress that a majority of Americans deal with on daily basis.

When speaking of stress at work, managerial and executive occupations come to mind, yet one of the highest predictors of workplace stress is lack of control over working conditions coupled with high demand. Inability to have a say in work hours and conditions of employment have profound health consequences resulting in heart attack rates three times higher than a random sample. Furthermore, job insecurity increases poor health by an incredible 50%, while long work hours contribute to increased mortality by almost 20%.

Americans today work longer hours, take less vacation and receive less pay for higher productivity which is coupled with towering rates of stress-related illnesses. In return for an opportunity to earn a living, we often relinquish our ability to have a say in conditions of employment and wages earned. It is the union that brings democracy back to the workplace and gives some of the control back to the workers. This power does not accrue overnight but is built upon years of collective bargaining and building of trust and solidarity among the workers.

For Rodriguez, building unity was worth it. “People frequently regard smaller cities as a stepping stone for other jobs with more pay and better opportunities,” he says. “But over the years we have negotiated strong contracts and workers stay.”

"We will not let anyone break what we have achieved here through years of solidarity."

His co-worker, Bill Brookhart, agrees. “As an individual alone you cannot stand up to the corporation. I have worked in non-unionized places, and there is no guarantee of or ability to negotiate job security, benefits, vacation or sick leave. I’m a diabetic and am insulin dependent. Having a good, union-negotiated health insurance makes a tremendous difference for me.”

Faced with the Supreme Court ruling on Janus, there was no hesitation among City of Pacific employees – every one of them chose to stand together as Teamsters. They have considered the effect that division could have on their contract negotiations and their power at work. The conclusion they came to was unanimous.

“You are either with us or you’re out,” said Rodriguez. “We will not let anyone break what we have achieved here through years of solidarity.”


From Teamsters family to Union Rep: Meet Taylor House

Taylor_profile.jpgTaylor comes from a Teamster tradition. Her grandfather was a Teamster, and her father got his first Teamsters job when she was three years old. Growing up, Taylor saw first hand the effect a union job had on the family which allowed her mother to spend more time with her and her four siblings.

Taylor is a familiar face at the Teamsters hall. She has been on administrative staff for almost two years and now is making the transition to represent a mix of private and public shops. Knowing the internal workings of the membership is a valuable resource to her, and she is excited to take on this new challenge.

As a Teamster, Taylor has given back to the community by volunteering at Tacoma Ethnic Fest, the Emergency Food Network and Paint Tacoma Beautiful. Later on, she helped organize the Teamsters Toy Drive and Family Volunteer Day. She co-chairs our strategic planning committee's political priority. To take a break from her dedicated union work, she takes long walks with her English Bulldog.

We are thrilled for Taylor growing her talents on our team and wish her the best of luck in her new role!


Secretary-Treasurer's Message: We Are the Union

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Sisters and Brothers,

Amazon recently announced a wage increase to a minimum of $15 for all of its workers. This decision is a direct result of public and political pressure on the company as reports of worker abuse and safety violations are mounting. However, the giant internet retailer is free to display a public act of generosity while simultaneously cutting employees’ bonuses and stock awards. This happens because the company is not held accountable internally for the decisions taken which directly affect the employees.

The Teamsters shop that you are working at, at one point, had no union. The workers at that location had to make the daunting decision to change how things are. They risked their position and their families' livelihoods to stand together as one and break through their employer’s resistance. They demanded that their right to negotiate with the employer for wages, working conditions, and benefits be recognized, and they won their fight.

We cannot forget these fights, and many of us never do. Our Sisters and Brothers who keep our union strong step out of the daily routine to advocate for co-workers. These are the shop stewards and member leaders who understand that our strength is in our unity and that solidarity is our weapon. They have the same work and family obligations as the rest of us, but they choose to lead, learn, and stand up for fairness at work. They sit through contract negotiations, dispel anti-union propaganda, and constantly organize their peers for strength.

At the membership meeting in September, we honored many members who sat on the negotiations committees and the graduates of our first ever Teamsters Leadership Academy who dedicated their time for eight months to cultivate their leadership and worker advocacy skills. It is important that we all recognize the hard work, passion, and dedication of members who step up to the task and become the advocates of our union to keep us strong and move us forward.

Workers need unions, and our children who are entering the workforce depend on today’s Teamsters to keep our union strong just as we depended on the Teamsters that came before us. Let us never forget that we stand on the shoulders of our predecessors and it is our duty to preserve and build upon their efforts.

 

In solidarity,

John Scearcy

Secretary-Treasurer

 

 


Not in our house! Teamsters at Supervalu fight to halt skimming

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Our union team gathers on the first day of contract negotiations with the SuperValu.


Teamsters at Supervalu were having none of it. The company had brought in out-of-town temps to operate forklifts at its distribution center in Tacoma. The temps were being prepped to do Teamster work in a Teamster warehouse. It was a classic case of skimming and, if allowed, would set a dangerous precedent just as our group was heading into contract negotiations.  

The shop steward on shift, Anthony McKinney, drew a firm line with management. "I talked to the GM, Steve LaBard, and expressed how I felt about having temps in our facility," he said. LaBard promised to send them home.

But the next day the temps were back again. At the start of his shift, McKinney was pulled into the office by the West Regional VP, who told him the company's plans had changed: The temps would no longer be used to operate forklifts; they would train our members on the forklifts instead. 

Forklift training, as McKinney knew, is also Local 117 work. The skimming violation would still be in play as long as the temps remained in the warehouse. Clearly, the company had not gotten the message. 

That's when McKinney and another shop steward, Greg Wiest, made the call. If the temps stayed, all 80 Teamsters on swing shift were going to walk. The stewards would give the company until 3:25pm to get the temps off of facility property. 

Word spread quickly through the warehouse. The crew gathered outside the office, while McKinney, Wiest, and other rank-and-file leaders went in to deliver the message to management. "We told them how we were being disrespected, how we weren't being listened to, and that we were going to walk," Wiest said.

"I don't think they expected the solidarity that our group showed."

The mangers were flummoxed, the deadline passed, and just like that the group shut down one of the largest grocery distribution centers in the Pacific Northwest.

With their entire workforce on the way out, the company had no choice but to capitulate. They agreed to get the temps off the floor. But the stewards weren't taking any chances. "We wanted to see them walk off the property before going back to work," Wiest said. So management rounded up the temps and walked them out. 

After the action, there were a lot of high fives and handshaking. Word spread to graveyard and day shift. The story of the workers' resolve will likely ripple across the grocery industry. It is especially remarkable given that they had just finished navigating the impact of a merger with Unified Grocers that added dozens of Local 117 members to the warehouse a few months ago.

For McKinney and Wiest, the group's unity sends a powerful message to the company that Teamsters will fight to maintain standards in the grocery industry as we head into contract negotiations this month. The company had tried to capitalize on the perceived divisions, but had underestimated us. "I don't think they expected the solidarity that our group showed," McKinney said. 


Tacoma Public Library Teamsters – A Lighthouse of Union Solidarity

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As the U.S. Supreme Court announces its ruling in the Janus case, corporate powerbrokers are hoping to use the decision to divide workers who dare belong to a union. They are expecting union members will act against their own self-interest because nothing benefits the employer more than when workers abandon their collective power to stand up for fairness in the workplace.

Those efforts have failed with Teamsters at Tacoma Public Library where every member has pledged commitment to their coworkers and to remain a union member. It is a futile exercise to misinform a librarian. Shannon Rich is a supervisor at the main Tacoma branch and a fourth generation Teamster. She finds the narrative absurd that abandoning her union is beneficial to her in any way.

“That’s the whole nature of the union – the constant giving back and forth among its members,” she says. “Together we build the working class, and we cannot do it without standing all as one. People like the Koch brothers and other corporations know that. This is the only way they figured out to put a wedge in people’s unity. Yet it will only be effective if we let them.”

It took an extensive fight to bring the union to her workplace and most people who work there remember. The library strongly opposed their workers efforts to unionize, yet they prevailed. Maria Shackles, a manager at the Wheelock branch, refers to the grueling history of unions fighting for human rights at work as her reason to distance herself from the Supreme Court ruling and remain a Teamster.

"Together we build the working class, and we cannot do it without standing all as one."

“I want to honor the work of people who came before us who have made huge sacrifices over the history of our country for progress of workers’ rights. Now we are reaping the benefits of the union, and I feel really lucky. The underlying organizers who pushed for the Janus case are corporations that don’t want to acknowledge the positive changes unions bring to the economy.”

It is these benefits that Shannon credits for being the first in her family to attend college and passing this privilege on to her daughter. She says she is one of the few lucky people who take pleasure in their work. Yet her individual dedication and skill is not enough to make the Tacoma Library a safe place to work at. In the wake of mass shootings, it took collective action to convince the management to institute safety procedures and training at the library.

In the new era of open shop, Shannon knows the way to protect her union and their hard-earned wins is countering misinformation.

“Our job is to get as much information to as many people as we can reach, which is vital to our society. We, the workers at the library, are the backbone of that. The union helps workers understand that they are valuable as individuals and provides the means for a democratic workplace.”

Learn more at www.familystrengthcommunity.org.


Local 117 members at Sysco stand in solidarity with Teamsters in Oklahoma

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"It's Our Union - And We'll Fight For It!" That's what Teamsters at Sysco are saying.

Today Local 117 members took part in a National Day of Action. The group of drivers and warehouse workers wore solidarity stickers & put signs in their vehicles in support of our Brothers & Sisters at Local 866 in Oklahoma where the company has fired two shop stewards & are trying to break the union.

The show of unity and support of fellow Teamsters across the country comes just a few weeks before contract negotiations with Sysco kick off this summer.

Our members are ready to fight for a contract that respects the critical work they do to house and supply food services products throughout our region.