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Teamsters 117 Wire

Audit leads to change in weapons law for DOC

As stated in a recent memo sent from the Department of Corrections to members of Teamsters 117, a new interpretation of the law that arose as a result of a WSP and FBI audit invalidates our Peace Officer Identification Cards effective immediately.

As a result, correctional employees who formerly met the requirements under the law are no longer able to carry concealed weapons without a concealed weapons license.  

This represents a blow to your right as a DOC employee to protect yourself in public, a right that our Teamsters union worked hard to achieve through a change in statute back in 2011.

Our Legislative Director, Brenda Wiest, is currently reviewing the statue in an effort to identify a legislative fix that will restore your right to carry a concealed weapon without the licensing requirement. Assuming a solution is viable, we will include this priority to our 2019 legislative agenda along with the other priorities we have identified: funding our 2019-2021 collective bargaining agreement and achieving statutory interest arbitration rights for DOC.

As always, your participation at our Lobby Day on February 26-27, 2019 and your engagement in Olympia this legislative session will be critical to achieving these priorities. We will keep you posted as soon as we have more information.

 


Welcome, Fallon Schumsky, our union’s new staff attorney!

Fallon_18.jpgWelcome, Fallon Schumsky, our union’s new attorney and former National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) field attorney, to our Teamsters staff!

Fallon is a Northwest native and graduate of the UW School of Law, but spent the first part of her career in Philadelphia, where she investigated unfair labor practices, prosecuted violations of the National Labor Relations Act, and ran NLRB elections. “I loved my work at the Board,” she says. “It’s where I learned the importance of collective bargaining and of union members having a voice.”

"I learned the importance of collective bargaining and of union members having a voice."

Balancing a busy legal career with her passion for community activism, Fallon managed to carve out time to serve on the board of directors of a Philadelphia non-profit that provides legal services to low-income immigrant families. She also rallied her friends and co-workers to join her on a team that bicycled from Philly to Atlantic City to raise money to fight cancer.

Raised in the farmlands of the Cascade foothills, Fallon grew up showing horses at the King County Fairgrounds in Enumclaw. An avid hiker and nature enthusiast, she loved Philly for its grit and diversity but missed the beauty of the Pacific Northwest during her stint on the East Coast.

She also yearned to become more of an advocate for workers than her job at the NLRB would allow. “When I met John and Tracey, I could see their passion for their members. I wanted to be directly involved in that.”

As our union’s new staff attorney, Fallon will work with General Counsel, Tracey Thompson, on handling arbitrations and unfair labor practice litigation and on providing legal guidance on behalf of the Local 117 membership.

We are thrilled to welcome Fallon to our team and wish her all the best!


Teamsters at the City of Tacoma flex their muscle

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Teamsters who work at the City of Tacoma showed up in force at City Hall last night to stand for fair pay, equity, and respect.

Members testified to the fact that the City’s revenues are healthy & Teamsters are doing high quality work that serves the community and supports local families.

City of Tacoma, let's honor our public servants!


Vanessa Lamb Joins Our Staff

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Welcome to our new Teamster staff member Vanessa Lamb!

Before starting with Teamsters, Vanessa worked as an Administrator for the WA State Building and Construction Trades Council Pre-Apprenticeship & Construction Education (PACE), a training program focused on preparing people for construction careers.

We are excited to have Vanessa on our team, and we wish her the best of luck!


DOC holiday meetings start in November. Full schedule here!

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Join us for our 2018 Holiday Membership Meetings for Teamsters at DOC. At the meetings, we will be discussing:

  • the interest arbitration award & our contract
  • our 2019 legislative agenda
  • Lobby Day 2019 and getting our contract funded
  • keeping our union strong with open shop

You can view days, times, and facilities below. Click on the link to your facility to RSVP.

INSTITUTION DAY DATE TIMES
AHCC Thursday November 29 0630, 0830, 1230, 1420, 1600 
CBCC Wednesday November 28 0600, 1130, 1300, 1410, 2100
CCCC Thursday November 15 0620, 1200, 1410, 1530
CI HQ Friday November 16 1300, 1430
CRCC Thursday November 15 0600, 0830, 1100, 1230, 1415, 1600, 1815
DOC HQ Monday December 3 0900-1100
LCC Tuesday November 27 0620, 1200, 1300, 1410, 1530
Maple Lane Pharmacy Wednesday November 28 1130, 1230
MCC Friday December 7 0630, 0930, 1130, 1430, 1630
MCCCW Friday November 15-16 11/15 at 2100, 11/16 at 1130, 1300, and 1410 
MICC Wednesday November 14 1000, 1500
OCC Thursday November 29 1130, 1300, 1410, 2100
SCCC Tuesday November 13 0500, 0615, 1130, 1415, 1630
SWRBO Monday December 10 1100
WCC Wednesday December 12 1100, 1230, 1410, 1600, 2100, 2200
WCCW Wednesday December 5 0620, 1130, 1300, 1410, 1530
WSP Tuesday November 27 0530, 0645, 0800, 1130, 1430, 1630

 


Rideshare wage calculator exposes hidden costs of driving for Uber and Lyft

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Uber and Lyft drivers attending a Driver Summit event today sponsored by the App-Based Drivers Association got a first look at a Rideshare Wage Calculator developed in partnership with Teamsters 117. The new tool, which can be accessed at www.drivercalculator.org, deducts common expenses such as gas, vehicle maintenance, and insurance from a driver’s weekly gross earnings to calculate estimated hourly pay. Drivers can compare their pay to the Seattle minimum wage and other types of jobs.

"The Rideshare Wage Calculator gives you a realistic calculation of your pay."

“The Rideshare Wage Calculator gives you a realistic calculation of your pay,” said Hari Lama, who has driven for Uber and Lyft for two years. “It reflects my experience that our pay has been decreasing over time and that the commission rates these companies are taking are too high. We need to be compensated fairly so we can earn a living wage.”

The methodology used to develop the Calculator is based on the work of Larry Mishel, a distinguished fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, who analyzed driver pay in his report Uber and the Labor Market published earlier this year. "It is important that every 'rideshare driver' accurately assess their earnings and be able to compare them to other workers on an apples-to-apples basis. This wage calculator provides just that tool," Mishel said.

Drivers at the meeting brought their concerns over high commission rates, decreasing pay, deactivation, and a lack of protection for workers to Seattle City Councilmember Teresa Mosqueda, who committed to work with others on the Council to develop new policies to raise standards in the industry.

“We need to establish policies to ensure that drivers in the for-hire transportation industry enjoy the same rights and protections as other workers in our City – the right to free association, the right to stand together in a union, and protections by Seattle’s sick and safe leave and minimum wage laws,” Councilmember Mosqueda said.

In April, the City Council passed a resolution to study data in the for-hire industry and explore equitable compensation for drivers, improve customer service, and ensure equal market access to all stakeholders. “Uber income is going down and our expenses are going up,” said Abebe Ephrem, who has been driving for Uber and Lyft since they entered the Seattle market in 2012. “The drivers have lives, they have apartments, they have families. The City needs policies so that we can be treated with respect, like human beings.”

Uber is near the top of companies in Washington State whose workers rely on food stamps to feed their families. According to a recent study by JP Morgan/Chase, average monthly earnings among active for-hire drivers in the first quarter of 2018 were 53 percent lower than their peak in the first quarter of 2014.

“The public should not be subsidizing billion dollar companies in a race to the bottom in driver pay,” said John Scearcy, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters 117. “Seattle needs to follow New York's lead and pass legislation to guarantee that drivers can earn a living wage.”

    


DOC Guardian: Unions are the foundation of freedom

Guardian_web.jpgThe new issue of our DOC Guardian newsletter is hot off the press!

Get caught up on our interest arbitration award, the new DOC contract, and our upcoming Teamsters lobby day on February 26-27 of next year.

You can also read about our new Membership Benefits Plus program and a shop steward at Airway Heights who hosted a barbecue to educate her co-workers about how to keep our union strong in a post-Janus world. 

Check out a PDF of the Guardian online here. Print copies will be available for members at the facilities over the next few weeks.


DOC Teamsters in Walla Walla interview candidate for the 16th legislative district

Wes_WilsonIn early October, a group of member leaders and Teamster staff spent several days at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla to discuss with members the recent interest arbitration award and how to keep our union strong in the post-Janus environment.

One evening, the group took time out to interview Skyler Rude, who is seeking our union’s endorsement. Skyler is running as a republican for a state house seat in the 16th Legislative District, which spans Walla Walla to Pasco and most of south Benton County.

Teamster Wesley Wilson, a corrections officer of 11 years at the Pen, was one of a handful of members who joined in the interview process and ultimately recommended an endorsement. We recently caught up with Wes to get his take on the candidate, the endorsement process, and politics in general.


Why do you think it’s important for our union to be involved in politics?
We have to be involved with politics because the legislature decides whether to fund our contract. We’ve got to have that political pull on both sides of the aisle. Whether it be democrats or republicans, we need to get people to understand the work that we do because it’s a dangerous job.

Was there anything that surprised you about the interview process or how our union endorses political candidates?
The surprising part for me was that I could be part of the process and give my perspective as someone who’s not a union representative. I didn’t think I could be included and that obviously was not the case.

What do you think our political priorities should be ahead of this next legislative session, especially for DOC Teamsters?
We need to make sure we’re reaching out to both political parties. A lot of people on the eastern side of the state fall on the more conservative side. So extending a hand across the aisle to get other republicans to see the value of what the union does for workers is a good deal.

What impressed you about Skyler Rude? Why did you recommend endorsing him?
He realizes the benefit and value of having worker rights and protections. I was very impressed by that. He is not going to say something that he doesn’t believe in just to get votes. I appreciate that honesty. He seems willing to speak his mind, vote the way he thinks is right, not just along party lines.

What would you say to a member who might be interested in getting involved in our union’s political program?
Being a union member, a Teamster, you do have a say. You have a say in addressing politicians or issues with the contract. We would have much more power and leverage if more people got involved. That’s what I took away from this – I felt like I had a voice, that my vote counted.


Teamster Talk: The Power of Solidarity

Fall_Talk_2018_Cover.jpgThe fall issue of Teamster Talk is here!

Read about the story of amazing solidarity that helped a shop steward get his position back after the company took advantage of immigration backlogs to terminate him. Then find out how a bus driver at the port of Seattle used her creativity to cultivate solidarity with her co-workers who are constantly on the road.

You can read it online here or check with your business representative for a hard copy. Teamster Talk will be distributed in your facility over the next few weeks.


Organizing Win! Americold clerical staff vote to become Teamsters

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Congratulations and welcome to a group of clerical staff at Americold who have voted overwhelmingly to become Teamsters. 

The group came together earlier this year to win retirement security, a voice on the job, and respect. Their NLRB union election took place today at the company's cold storage facility in Fife.

"I want to have someone to fall back on and defend my rights in the workplace."

"I support forming a union with the Teamsters because I want to have someone to fall back on and defend my rights in the workplace," said Allison Knight, who works in inventory control.

The clerical group joins a hundred of their Teamster Sisters and Brothers who work in the warehouse at the Fife facility. 

"Congratulations to our newest members. We're excited to welcome them to our union," said John Scearcy, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters 117.  "As members of Teamsters 117, we can all gain inspiration from the strength and determination these workers showed to stand together and win a voice on the job." 

 


VIDEO: The Power of Solidarity

Shop steward Van Huyhn was unjustly terminated by his Coca Cola employer, but his co-workers stood in solidarity to expedite his return to work.


Humane Society Teamsters Vote Yes and Merge Under New Contract

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Teamsters of Humane Society bargaining team recognized at Teamsters membership meeting .


An estimated 10 million dogs are lost every year. When brought into shelters, they frequently exhibit aggressive and defensive behaviors. It is up to shelter employees like kennel aide Alexander Yeatman to care for them and put them at ease. At the Humane Society for Tacoma and Pierce County, Yeatman does the dangerous and dirty labor of cleaning the kennels, yet he wouldn’t trade his job for any other.

When the animals come in, apprehensive and sometimes injured, it is his passion to help them get their confidence back, gain healthy weight, and show their true characters. Yet the management can too easily dismiss Alex’s voice and assessment in observing the animals. “Pets score on a behavioral test a certain way when they come in, but they behave very differently once they get accustomed to the kennel. I need my voice to be heard so that I can advocate for the animals I care for,” he said.

"Now we are able to speak up for the animals and get the equipment we need to provide adequate care. We are not afraid of retaliation anymore."

Last year, Alex decided to change that. He played an essential role in organizing the kennel aides, and now he is a shop steward and a Teamster. “It used to be like walking on eggshells, so by unionizing I wanted us to be recognized as a vital part of the organization. We’re not just poop picker-uppers. I wanted to show the employer that this position should be valued,” stated Alex.


Another win as Teamsters at Sysco overwhelmingly ratify new contract

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Our union bargaining team meets at the Tukwila hall during contract negotiations with Sysco.


Great news for Teamsters in the food service industry! This weekend our members at Sysco voted overwhelmingly to ratify a new 3-year contract. The agreement provides annual wage increases, retirement security, and affordable health care for over 200 Local 117 members and their families.

“Our negotiations committee worked incredibly hard to achieve this agreement,” said John Scearcy, Secretary-Treasurer of Teamsters 117 and the lead negotiator for the union. “Together with last year’s contract at US Foods, this agreement sets the standard for food service contracts across the country.”

Getting to a deal was far from easy. Sysco is a massive multinational food service conglomerate, the largest broadline food distributor in the world. The company has made life difficult for Teamsters in other parts of the country.  

Earlier this year, Local 117 members showed solidarity with Teamsters in Oklahoma where the company fired several shop stewards. In Missouri, Sysco employees established an unfair labor practice picket line at the end of 2017 to protest alleged violations of federal labor law.

Here in the Northwest, the group’s unity and resolve helped beat back proposed concessions at the bargaining table. The group sent a powerful message to the company when they voted unanimously to authorize a strike several weeks ago.

“We went into these negotiations with clear goals and expectations,” said Rowan Griffin, a shop steward on our union bargaining team.  “John Scearcy’s skills as a negotiator are undeniable. We are lucky to have such strong leadership in our union.”

"We were successful because we have strong leadership and solid member participation."

Will Buff, a rank-and-file veteran of several Sysco negotiations, reiterated that point. “We were successful because we have strong leadership and solid member participation. There was trust between our negotiations team and our union’s leadership like never before.”

“Our members take pride in their work and know their value,” Scearcy said. “They stuck together and fought to win a contract that reflects the important service they provide to families who rely on meals at hospitals, schools, daycare centers, and nursing homes across our region.”


Members glean valuable information from Teamsters pension training

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Union officials, representatives, and members from around the West gathered to learn more about the power of the Teamsters pension plan.


It’s one of the most secure, well-funded defined benefit pension plans in the country. The Western Conference of Teamsters Pension Plan, commonly known as the Teamsters pension, provides retirement security to over 200,000 active participants in 13 Western states.

Last week, representatives of the pension, including plan trustees, provided a day-long training for Local Union officers, representatives, and rank-and-file leaders from across the West. The goal was to familiarize the group with resources, better assist members, and succeed in negotiations.

The agenda delved into the history of the plan, an overview of the plan’s website, field support, effective bargaining techniques, and the advantages of the plan as compared to a 401(k).

Matt Collins, a shop steward at Fred Meyer, was one of the Local 117 members in attendance. “I was able to get critical information about the pension that will help me better serve my fellow Teamster brothers and sisters,” he said.

"I was able to get critical information about the pension that I can take back to the shop floor..."

Another member who joined in was Anthony McKinney, a shop steward at SuperValu. McKinney, together with fellow bargaining committee members, just finished negotiating pension increases in their contract.

“It’s important to get information out to the younger generation,” he said. “There is an information gap with people who only see the now-factor of life and may not be thinking about the future of their families. I will bring this back to my facility and become an advocate to make sure that all of us fully understand how important it is to keep the pension rates going up from contract to contract.”

James Borsum, who joined our Local's rep staff last year, said he was grateful for the training as well: “I get a lot of questions on the shop floor about how our pension compares with other pension plans. Fortunately, I can report back to our members that our pension is in great shape and what we need to do to keep it strong for the future.”

The Western Conference of Teamsters Pension Plan is managed by a Board of Trustees and administered by Northwest Administrators. If you want information about your estimated benefit under the plan, you can set up a personal pension appointment by calling Diana McDowell at 206-441-7470. To set up a pension meeting for you and your co-workers, talk to your union representative.


Arbitrator awards DOC Teamsters significant bump in pay

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SEE COMPLETE CONTRACT SUMMARY DOCUMENT INCLUDING RAISES FOR ALL CLASSIFICATIONS HERE

This afternoon Arbitrator Joseph Duffy sent us his interest arbitration award outlining DOC Teamsters compensation for the 2019-2021 biennium. The award contains significant pay increases for all members of the bargaining unit.

According to the award, all Teamster correctional employees will receive no less than an 8% general wage increase over the next two years. The award calls for a general increase of 4% effective July 1, 2019 and a 4% increase effective July 1, 2020 for all classifications.

In addition, the arbitrator has awarded the following range increases:

CLASSIFICATION CURRENT RANGE NEW RANGE
Warehouse Operator 1 29G 31G
Warehouse Operator 2 32G 34G
Warehouse Operator 3 36G 38G
Warehouse Operator 4 40G 42G
Ferry Operator Assistant 37E 39E
Ferry Operator 45E 47E
Corrections and Custody Officer 4 51 56
Corrections Mental Health Counselor 2 49 52
Corrections Mental Health Counselor 3 51 54
Sex Offender Treatment Specialist 55 57
Sex Offender Treatment Supervisor 59 61
Health Records Technician 1   44
Health Records Technician 2   49
Corrections Specialist Assistant   39
Corrections Specialist 4   61
Physician Assistant Certified – Lead   76N
Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner – Lead 74N 78N
Data Consultant 3   52
Corrections and Custody Officer 2 43 44
Corrections and Custody Officer 3 48 50
Classification Counselor 3 49 50
Fiscal Anaylst 4 52 54

 

Additionally:

  • Shift Premium for Nurses will now include CNA and MA classifications and is increased from $1.50 per hour to $2.50 per hour;
  • Standby pay for overtime exempt Physician Assistant/Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner, Physician Assistant Certified/Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner Lead, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Psychiatric Social Worker 3 or 4, Psychiatrist 4, Psychologist 3 or 4, or Psychology Associate increases from $50/day to $100/day and for all other overtime exempt from $25/day to $50/day;
  • When a CDL certification, license, and physical exam are required for a chain bus position, the employer will reimburse the cost of the initial certification, license, and physical exam up to $3,800 when the employee successfully bids into a chain bus position. All renewal costs will be the responsibility of the employee;
  • Honor guard will receive assignment pay on an hour for hour basis for every hour worked during an authorized team related assignment or training. The assignment pay is basic salary plus two (2) ranges and will be paid to trained and qualified employees who are assigned members of the Honor Guard.

With the arbitrator's award, we see once again the immense power of having interest arbitration in our contract. The arbitrator awarded double what the State’s final offer was in contract negotiations. For many classifications, it will be significantly higher than that.

Assuming the Office of Financial Management (OFM) deems the award financially feasible, it will be included in the Governor’s budget. At that point, the legislature must decide whether or not to fund our contract.

Getting our DOC contract funded will take members across the state talking to their representatives in Olympia about the challenges you face every day to keep the public safe. Your participation in next year's Teamsters Lobby Day will be crucial. We will be sending out details about the event soon.

Thank you to our incredible union committee that worked so hard during contract negotiations. They deserve enormous praise for their fortitude, hard work, and professionalism.

You can view the arbitrator’s complete award here.

Thank you for your service to our communities. Please stay safe.